Reflexion

  • Installation

About project

Perex

The Reflexions‘s parallel environment absorbs and connects us all. Are we just a fragment of society that does not fit anywhere and is not anchored? Or are we part of something bigger? Are we a fluid swarm of pixels organically rearranged and manipulated by external incomprehensible influences? 

Description

The desire to stare at the water is essentially rooted in the corners of human minds since time immemorial. We are fascinated by its calming movement of waves and its ever-changing reflections. The water surface was the first object to reflect our ancestors’ faces, and perhaps, the glimpse of their faces grants the human race some realization of our own identity.

The abandoned church is a symbol of human’s ability to forget their ancient laws. Out of Earth artifact appears in the temple’s presbytery. It is an altar of water surface, which offers an opportunity for self-reflection on our deeds: Even though ground-breaking technology daily leads to a blind hope of an instant solution to increasing problems of the human race, the growing destruction of the environment necessary for the homo sapiens race survival is pushing us towards thoughts of a settlement in Space and a creation of a new spacious home. Nevertheless, without water, there is no survival.

The audience is confronted by a vertical surface and becomes a part of the exhibition. Their reflection depends on the will of the altar and acts upon it – it gradually transforms, fragments, and reconnects into new unforeseen links. This object, which is formed by advanced technology, places the audience within an existential mirror.

The object uncovers the parallel between presence and the ancient human race observing its reflection in the water surface. It creates not only an impressive experience but also an opportunity for our contemplation. An opportunity for each one of us to stop and contemplate the difference between a pride of technological progress and the humbleness of our ancient relationship with the life-giving element. 

About artist

Petr Vacek and Adam Cigler are Czech architects who synergize a creative artistic approach with programming, robotics, digital fabrication and traditional craftsmanship. Their collaboration arose during their studies at the Faculty of Arts and Architecture in Liberec and, thanks to a common fondness for advanced technology, science, space or philosophy, crystallized into an aesthetically appealing freeform creative experiment.

Supported by

  • PrusaLab